Posts Tagged: divesin

featured artist :: divesin

from the archives: 5.10.10

name: Jackie Dives
company: Divesin
links: etsy | blog

What do you make?
I mostly make collages and take photographs. I have been collaging and taking photographs since I was in elementary school. Right now my collages are taking a couple different personalities.

There is an ongoing series that I work on for craft fairs and for sale on my Etsy site. These are made on wood panels that are hollow in the back so they can be hung easily. I use images from books that would otherwise be sent to the dump. I rescue them and make something new from them.

I am also working on a series of 20 collages that each have a Chinese proverb in them. These are fun and made from all kinds of different papers.

I take photographs every day of the things I see around town. My favourite thing to photograph is people.

I also make love. I make nutritious meals from scratch, my blog, and a garden.

What or who inspires you?
Like most creative people I get inspiration from things I see when I am out and about. People, places, nature, conversations overheard on the bus. I get very inspired to create when I am grocery shopping at a market, thrifting, and drinking tea with friends. I am currently greatly inspired by these specific artists: Andy Dixon, Ronan Boyle, Jesse Reno, Chanda Stallman, Randy Laybourne.

How did you get started?
Slowly. A few years ago I pulled my hardly ever used sewing machine out of the closet in my bedroom and began making bags. My grandfather died around the same time and I was given a box of family photographs, which I used to make a series of greeting cards. I made magnets, notebooks, brooches, and other cute things. I held a craft show in my little apartment, which turned into a full time store on Main Street. Now, I’m happy to be working from home, taking my time to explore the different forms of creativity that interest me.

What are your favourite materials to work with?
I keep a glue stick and my camera with me wherever I go. I also love very old things from wood to ceramics to books to fabrics, to jars and more.

Do you have any advice for those in the biz?
Don’t give up. Being an artist is hard. Keep at it.

Do you consider yourself an artist or a crafter?
This is a hard question for me to answer. At a different point in time it might have been easier to define and separate the two words, but presently, I think they overlap and are merging into one meaning. At times I might be an artist, other times a crafter. But ultimately I am a creator. I passionately and consistently create things.

first photo via [stu-di-o] by jeanie

tutorial :: canning spicy beans

guest post by Jackie Dives

Take advantage of the bounty of harvest time by canning foods so they are available to eat in the winter months. Despite the rumours, canning is not as difficult or time consuming as people make it out to be. It is a fun activity that keeps your mind and body healthy. Green beans are available year round, with a peak season of May to October.

Equipment:

  1. 4 500ml canning jars with lids and rings
  2. 3 pots – small, medium, large

For inexpensive jars keep a look out at your local thrift store. Double check that the jars are crack and chip free. Jars and rings are reusable, but lids are not. Once the lid’s sealing compound is used it will not reseal properly again.

If you find a bunch of jars at a thrift store with no lids or rings it’s no problem. You can buy them at most grocery stores. If you prefer to buy new jars Canadian Tire has a great selection.

Optional equipment: (These things will help, but are not necessary)

  1. canning tongs
  2. lid lifter
  3. plastic spatula

If you are missing some equipment have a look at this website for DIY canning equipment instructions.

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup kosher or canning salt
  • 2 ½ cups of white vinegar
  • 2 ½ cups of water
  • 2 lbs green beans, cleaned and ends trimmed
  • 3 jalapenos
  • 4 sprigs of dill
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 2 tsp black pepper

Step 1: In large pot sterilize jars by boiling them for 10 mins. Water should be one inch above jars.

Step 2: While the jars are sterilizing, cut up the jalapenos and garlic.

Step 3: After 10 mins, take the jars out of the water. If you have tongs, use them. If not, wait for the water to cool before you take them out.

Step 4: Fill the jars with beans, jalapenos, garlic, dill and pepper.

Step 5: On high heat, stir the water, vinegar and salt in the medium pot, until the salt is completely dissolved. This liquid is the brine.

Step 6: Pour the brine into the jars, leaving about 1 inch of room below the top of the jar.

Step 7: Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean cloth or paper towel. There can’t be anything on the rim, or else it may not seal properly.

Step 8: Remove any air bubbles by using the plastic spatula. The first time I canned I just used a plastic fork.

Step 9: Put the jars back in the large pot, adding water if needed, and boil for 10 mins. This is called heat processing.

Step 10: After 10 mins, take the jars out of the water. See step 3. Leave your jars to cool. The lids will make a snap or pop sound when they have sealed. If any of your jars do not seal, keep them in the fridge and eat from those jars first. Store the jars for a min of two weeks before eating.

These are basic instructions for canning. You can use this method for other foods including turnip, beets, okra, carrots. Simply look online for ingredient lists and heat processing times.

Originally posted on Granville Online August 31, 2010.