Posts Tagged: pattern

NEW :: Block Printing on Textiles Workshop at Got Craft?

BlockPrintingblockprinting bag high resJoin Heather Young from The Craft Lab for a three hour textile block printing workshop. Using simple tools, students will learn how to carve printing blocks and transfer the designs onto fabrics. Repeat techniques for half drop, half brick, centered and mirror will be covered. Play with the immediate and versatile technique and build up a variety of patterns. At the end of the workshop students will have sample patterns to take home and a completed print on a cotton drawstring bag. Novice and experienced makers welcome. The fee includes all tools and fabrics as well as a cotton drawstring bag.

Students will make:
* A lino cut stamp
* A string stamp
* 10 print samples
* A finished textile design on a drawstring cotton bag

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This workshop takes place at:
Got Craft?
Sunday, May 3rd, 2015
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Maritime Labour Centre
1880 Triumph Street, Vancouver (at Victoria Drive)

Cost: $60.00 plus tax (includes $20 material fee and entry to Got Craft?)

REGISTER online >> here << or in person at London Fields Shoppe located at 692 East Hastings (at Heatley Street) in Vancouver (open 11-5pm Wednesday to Sunday).

Space is limited to 12 students. Advance registration required.

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Heather Young is the founder of The Craft Lab. She has an extensive background in clothing & textile design spanning twenty years. She completed a fashion design degree from LaSalle College in Montreal and returned to her native Vancouver to begin the clothing line Dust. She designed and sold the woman’s line to stores in New York, Montreal, Tokyo and Vancouver. In 2013 Heather completed a Masters of Fashion and Textiles from the Glasgow School of Art specializing in textile design using natural dyes. Her interests lie in sustainability and fashion, design process and building community through making. She has been teaching in fashion schools since 2006.

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The Sewists

Sewists1Sewists2Back in 2012, I was contacted by Josephine Perry, an instructor at the Liberty Sewing School, to contribute a project for her upcoming book. I am super excited to announce that her book, The Sewists – DIY Projects from 20 Top Designers-Makers, will be launching in the UK this September!

From jewellery to bookbinding, felt craft to embroidery, screen-print to dressmaking, The Sewists takes a rare snoop inside the sewing rooms of creative crafters and gives space to the reasons why they love their craft. Projects include hand-bound notebooks, patchwork coasters, applique cushions, and of course, fabric pouches by Roxypop!

For more information or to purchase a copy, click here.

Thanks to Miranda from Blue Olive Photography for snapping the shots of my craft room!

i love :: orange studio

Loving Helen Dardik’s illustrations that were recently on the Etsy front page. Her designs emit a Scandinavian feel and with her use of colour, these would make a fantastic and affordable wall art option! Diving into her website and blog, I learned that she also designs amazing patterns that are then created into fabrics. Wouldn’t these be perfect for cushions, curtains, to reupholster a chair or even framed as art? The options are endless.

Find her here: website | blog | shop

all images by one lucky helen

craft project :: DIY rocket ship

guest post + images by amanda wood

From splashing in the pool to shooting to outer space. Now that fall is upon us, transform your neglected pool noodles into rocket ships that really take off.

Rather than cluttering up the garage for a whole year, turn those pool noodles into good fun by creating rocket ships that really fly. Using just a few simple household items, it’s a quick project that will give the kids a little backyard adventure for those crisp fall days. While an adult is needed to do the cutting part of the project, the assembly could be done by school age children.

Materials needed:
Pool noodles *
Card stock (Any type of stiff card stock will work such as the back of a notepad, shirt card or even corrugated cardboard boxes. Dig around in your recycling bin!)
Utility knife or x-acto knife (Scissors can be used for cutting, but it will be a little more difficult to get a nice clean edge.)
Metal ruler
Cutting mat
Pebble
* Each pool noodle will make about three rocket ships. You can use either the smooth sided or bevel sided versions.

Step One:
Cut three 3″x4″ rectangles out of the cardstock. These will be the starting point for the three fins. If you are making more than one rocket ship, you might want to cut enough rectangles for each one at this point.

Step Two:
On each of the three fins, cut the point off one corner by measuring down 1″ on either side of the point. This should give you about a 1.5″ angle. It doesn’t need to be too precise, but we found that this gave it a nice proportion.

Step Three:
Measuring down 18″ from one end, cut off a section of the pool noodle. This is your rocket ship body.

Step Four:
Trim one end of the rocket ship so that it has a cone-shaped or bevelled point like a pencil. This will be the nose of the rocket ship.

Step Five:
On the tail end of the rocket ship body, you will need to cut slits into the body to insert the fins. Use the long side of the fins to help measure the length. There should be two slits evenly spaced on the bottom and one slit on the top. You can slide the fins into place ensuring that the angled corner is on top facing the front of the rocket ship.

Step Six:
Once the fins are in place, secure them with duct tape.

Step Seven:
You are ready to blast off! Just raise the rocket ship above your head in one hand and launch it just like you would a paper airplane. These rockets really can go quite far and high, so I recommend using them outside where there is plenty of space.

Try a little science experience by testing different materials for the weight in the nose and different sizes and weights of passengers (see below). See which combination makes it go the highest or farthest!

Giddy Up!
If you would like to have a passenger in your rocket ship, you can trim out a cockpit in the middle of the top of the body. Use your toy as a guide to the size of the cut-out. Since the pool noodle is hollow, a nice little space is created to nestle in a little figurine such as playmobile or any other toy of a similar size.

Caution: Your passenger may jump ship if the rocket gets up a good speed, so don’t use anything too precious that might break!

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Amanda Wood makes handmade goods for the family home under the name Owl + Pussycat. As a mom of two active boys who is passionate about bringing DIY into the hands of children, she is always on the lookout for thrifty craft ideas to keep them busy. Blog | Etsy